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Clean Geosphere Private Limited
91 Springboard Business Hub, Kagalwala House, Bandra Kurla Complex, CST Road, Kalina Mumbai - 400098

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contact@cleangeosphere.com

overview

Waste Management

Waste management or waste disposal are the activities and actions required to manage waste from its inception to its final disposal. This includes the collection, transport, treatment and disposal of waste, together with monitoring and regulation of the waste management process. Waste can be solid, liquid, or gas and each type has different methods of disposal and management. Waste management deals with all types of waste, including industrial, biological and household. In some cases, waste can pose a threat to human health. Waste is produced by human activity, for example, the extraction and processing of raw materials. Waste management is intended to reduce adverse effects of waste on human health, the environment or aesthetics.

A large portion of waste management practices deal with municipal solid waste (MSW) which is the bulk of the waste that is created by household, industrial, and commercial activity.

The waste hierarchy refers to the “3 Rs” reduce, reuse and recycle, which classifies waste management strategies according to their desirability in terms of waste minimization. The waste hierarchy is the cornerstone of most waste minimization strategies. The aim of the waste hierarchy is to extract the maximum practical benefits from products and to generate the minimum amount of end waste. The waste hierarchy is represented as a pyramid because the basic premise is that policies should promote measures to prevent the generation of waste.

The next step or preferred action is to seek alternative uses for the waste that has been generated i.e. by re-use. The next is recycling which includes composting. Following this step is material recovery and waste to- energy. The final action is disposal, in landfills or through incineration with or without energy recovery. This last step is the final resort for waste which has not been prevented, diverted or recovered. The waste hierarchy represents the progression of a product or material through the sequential stages of the  pyramid of waste management. The hierarchy represents the latter parts of the life-cycle for each product.

The life-cycle begins with design, then proceeds through manufacture, distribution, and primary use and then follows through the waste hierarchy’s stages of reduce, reuse and recycle. Each stage in the life cycle offers opportunities for policy intervention, to rethink the need for the product, to redesign to minimize waste potential, to extend its use. Product life-cycle analysis is a way to optimize the use of the world’s limited resources by avoiding the unnecessary generation of waste.

Areas with developing economies often experience exhausted waste collection services and inadequately managed and uncontrolled dumpsites. The problems are worsening. Problems with governance complicate the situation. Waste management in these countries and cities is an ongoing challenge due to weak institutions, chronic under resourcing and rapid urbanization. All of these challenges, along with the lack of understanding of different factors that contribute to the hierarchy of waste management, affect the treatment of waste.